About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNBC 32
CNNW 9
CSPAN 5
CNN 3
CSPAN2 2
KQED (PBS) 2
FBC 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
WETA 1
WMPT (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 61
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)
three weeks left before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. >>> italian shares are down nearly 3% this morning. for the most part, it is bank stocks leading the way down. we're now down about 2.76% on the ftse mib. bank stocks have been hit particularly hard this morning. earlier, we saw shares down 5.6%. we're seeing the same thing, whether it's bmps hitting session lows down nearly 6% comes amid concerns about leadership and economic reform in italy following mario monte's announcement that he'll resign once the budget has been passed. this move is likely to bring the country forward to elections next year. the italian prime minister has offered no clue as to whether or not he will run and it comes after sylvia berlusconi declared over the weekend he would throw his hat in the ring for the job of premier. carolyn ross is in italy following the details there. can you walk us through the time frame here? when are we expected monte to step down? what happens next? >> good morning to you, kelly. here is the time frame for you. over the next few weeks, we're expecting the budget sta
places besides the u.s. stock market. the metals were on fire today, particularly silver. slv, that's the way you play it. goes much higher. >> all right, i'm melissa lee. see you tomorrow, 9:00 a.m. we have the ceo of tomorrow's ipo solar city, then back here at 5:00 >>> i'm jim cramer and welcome to my world. >> you need to get in the game. >> he's nuts! they're nuts! they know nothing! >> i always like to say there's a bull market somewhere. "mad money." you can't afford to miss it. i'm cramer. welcome to "mad money." my job is not just to entertain but i'm trying to teachary and coach you. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. you can blame the democrats for their inability to offer any cuts for spending. you can blame the republicans for not even wanting to consider tax increases. but don't you dear blame ben bernanke for not being willing to take bold action to get this economy hiring and moving again! even if his statements about economic weakness ultimately caused the averages to stumble from some pretty lofty levels. dow only declining ability 3 points s & p inching up 4.4%. close in
view threaten u.s. interests in africa and require the attention of the government and the world. that's why we convened the hearing to assess and a path forward and stabilize the situation and to address ongoing humanitarian needs. i would like to welcome my friend and partner on the subcommittee senator ikesson and i understand we may well be joined by others and to thank our distinguished witnesses for sharing their insight and expertise. earlier this year, a security and political vacuum was exploited by extremists. today al qaeda and aqim and two affiliated groups control the majority of northern malli an area roughly the size of the state of texas making it the largest territory controlled by islamist extremists in the world. i am concerned the current approach is not comprehensive and forward leaning enough to address all threeze crises, security and plit and humanitarian. today we'll examine the policies. we'll assess evolving plans for a regionly led multilateral intervention and consider the complimentry goals of encouraging elections and restoring security by reclaiming the
have the capacity as a u.s. military to have policy as well. that's a global capability. but that means that they respected the choices that are made by other powers we want to sustain a presence in the asia-pacific. same to is the middle east. as you look at these different areas i think that there are terrific opportunist who engage with china on each of them. and to fundamentally ask the question and try to answer the question secretary clinton and state counselors have been engaging for some time, and that is can we get a better answer than we have had in the past two how a new rise in power comes to the international system. and can we do so without running significant risks or indeed fall into conflict. >> thanks. please. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary has said your, and, in fact, admiral sam locklear underscore those pushes a couple days ago in australia. talking about engagement and that strategic trust. but it's interesting that the chinese tend to look at the american, ma asia pacific give it a sort of a continuing strategy. which speaks to the inability to real
a collaborative flee to support the u.s. efforts and what is a very challenging and dynamic security humanitarian and diplomatic context. thank you very much for your testimony. we will take a brief break while the second panel comes. >> we would like to now turn to the second panel one today's hearing about mali and the path forward. our second panel will include mr. niikwao akuetteh and joining us live this is our first attempt at live testimony by google [inaudible] i suspect nobody has testified by this, the thing i didn't know existed. so my thanks to the technical assistance and the policy support of several very capable folks who made this happen. dr. fomunyoh you may begin and we appreciate your testimony today >> thank you, chairman to an and ranking member isaacson pivot on behalf of the national democratic institute, have the opportunity to discuss the political developments in mali. today crisis is two-thirds of the country which is humanitarian and has admitted for under 50,000 people. the political uncertainty in the capitol and the severe food shortage that is affecting the entire
.n.'s office on drugs and crime, the u.s. gun homicide rate is 30 times that of france or australia. it is 12 times higher than the average for other developed countries. why is that? if psychology is the main course, we should see that we have 12 times as many psychologically disturbed people as the oecd average. we don't. in fact, america takes mental disorders seriously, treats them and doesn't stigmatize them. we do better in this area than most of our peers. is america's popular culture much worse than other rich countries? not really since it's largely the same popular culture worldwide. england and wales, for example, are exposed to virtually identical cultural influences as the u.s. yet, their rate of gun homicide is some 3% of ours. the japanese are at the cutting edge of the world of video games, yet the u.n. puts their gun homicide rate at close to zero. why? well, they have one of the most restrictive series of gun laws in the world. when looking internationally, it is obvious that the one feature of america that would explain why we have so much more gun violence than the rest of
remain before the u.s. goes over the edge. that means tax hikes and spending cuts that could trigger another recession. congressional leaders will meet today at 3:00 p.m. eastern time. the full house not even expected to return to work until sunday. here is the guest list for today's showdown. the president, vice president biden, senate majority leader harry reid and house minority leader nancy pelosi on the democratic side. house speaker john boehner, mitch mcconnell representing the republicans. brianna keilar live from washington. what do we expect to happen today? any new offers from the president or house speaker? >> we don't know. right now, all eyes on the senate to see what senate majority leader harry reid can cobble together to get some republican support. technically, it's still possible to come to an agreement. that said, politically is a different story, and the prospects for coming to a deal are starting to dim. right now, we're hearing a whole lot of the blame game. a lot of public posturing from both sides as they prepare for the possibility of going over the cliff. l
this? lawmakers put a band-aid on the problem and the u.s. lost its aaa crediting rating. i've warned you over and over about the economic storm headed our way partly because of europe and this fiscal lif, but i've also told you about an american economic renaissance that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable, but every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being doing. john king, ken rogoff and diane swan, chief economist at mezaro financial. john, right now, this is more politics than the economy. some people are saying don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done. an 11th hour deal. john, as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> i see both sides digging in. you've just played the president saying i want that rate hike. the republicans are saying mr. president, we'll give you the revenues, but not through a rate hike, but the president believes he won the election and he's upped the ante. says he wants twice as much in tax revenues than a year and a half ago, so the presid
next year is likely to be a bit better next year here in the u.s. and globally. >> susie: we saw that treasury yields rose, and is this a signal to get out of treasures and to put your money into stocks? this has been a safety area for most investors. >> it sure is. i bought a bond and it went up, and why do you want to take this away from me. but i believe in the premises of your question. if, in fact, the economy is a little better, and the financial risks are a little bette th's a recipe for very low interest rates, for a mild increase in interest rates, which means bond prices go down. i would not be overweight in the treasury area. i would have modest weights and have the rest made up in equity, susie. >> susie: bob, thanks a lot. we look forward to your 10 predictions in 2013. we'll be talking to you about that. robert doll as nuveen as asset manament. >> susie: there was a new twist today in the samsung-apple saga over patent disputes. samsung electronics dropped a critical lawsuit banning the sale of apple products in euope. the good news helped put some shine on apple sh
surprise to everybody. >> this is a very strong number. i think only u.s. government now can stop this kind of job growth. a fiscal cliff go over -- >> snatching victory from the jaws. >> a superstorm. nothing can stop the generation of jobs in this economy. >> there's a great article today in one of the papers about how apartment building, we have a shortage of apartments and shortage of housing and shortage of autos and shortage of office buildings developing, shortage of shopping centers, shortage of shopping malls. this is what begins a movement. you have to hire eventually. now you could say people are not looking for work, come on. look, jobs are here. they can -- it can be just easily reversed if you have no idea what is the future because of washington. >> given the data points that we've had in terms of claims numbers that did reflect an impact from sandy, they said 85,000 jobs or 86,000 jobs were sliced because of impact of sandy. average hours worked unchanged. doesn't that -- i don't know -- doesn't that bring into question a little bit the participation in the survey. how can i
november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had this number last week. reminds people, again, they've been right down, and up. mcdonald's is one of those things where joe asked me from squawk when we were talking, i said, i think this is a for real term. if they continue to innovate. i may this may not be your cup of tea, burger, but innovation s higher. >> they tried to sell it to consumers as opposed to their extra value menu, which is a little bit higher price point. that combined with these product innovations, they're very cognizant of margins when they're trying to push iced mixed drinks. the sandwich -- which i've not tried. >> you said cheddar/baconburger. >> it looks like they're going to remain modest at best. margins are going to be a bigger piece. i thin
. >> absolutely. and you could argue that the u.s. could actually be benefitting right now because as rich grizz, we'r countries go, we're doing pretty well. this is still a very good place to invest. but there is a tremendous amount of uncertainty in our political process. i would say one other thing on the point of taxes. it's not just about math-- although i agree with mark's points. the bush tax increases on the upper income folks in the u.s. are about 5%. but they haveave big social impact because i think, again, you can look at europe and see what happens when you try to do austerity and don't have social cohesion and buy? and a feeling that everyone is doing their part. >> schieffer: mark. >> you know, my view is that these are really big issues we're trying to nail down here. this is entitlement reform, medicare, med karkd social security, the tax code. it would be lard for me to believe we could come to kumbaya over these poornz it is part of the process. it is quite amazing the way the policy makers designed this. i absolutely agree. the uncertainty is a killer. it's weighing on busine
. >> stephen, talk to me about this. the fact is we do think the entrepreneur as heroic in the u.s. how do you square that circle? >> i think the backbone is the entrepreneur. i think republicans have to make this connection with workers that, you know, if you hurt the businesses who are hurting jobs, i don't think they've done a good job of doing that. i certainly agree that health care is a big issue. i kind of agree with david that republicans have kind attacked the obama idea. i think reasons have to a very robust alternative that might be rejected in the years ahead. >> the problem is alternatives are lacking. criticism is in abundant supply. so, david, what do we do? where do the ideas come from? where is the well that republican party should be looking at for the new ideas? >> the republican party has to rebuild a lot of their ideas about the budget. you know what, on health care, for example, obama care is a fact. it is a fact. and its -- that's what this election decided it is not going to go away. so any republican idea about how maybe there will be a better way to do it or maybe we
. the fact is we do think the entrepreneur as heroic in the u.s. how do you square that circle? >> i think the backbone is the entrepreneur. it's the person who sets out the shingle and employs work eers. i think republicans have to make this connection with workers that, you know, if you hurt the businesses, you are hurting jobs. i don't think they've done a good job of doing that. i certainly agree that health care is a big issue. i kind of agree with david that republicans have kind attacked the obama idea. they haven't been forthright about what they want to do to fix these things. health care is a perfect example. i think republicans have to have a very robust alternative to obama care because that might be rejected in the years ahead. >> the problem is alternatives are lacking. criticism is in abundant supply. so, david, what do we do? where do the ideas come from? where is the well that republican party should be looking at for the new ideas? the criticism alone didn't work. >> the republican party has to rebuild their idea generating apparatus. the republican party had a lot of fis
. is anybody looking at how tax hikes fail the test of economic growth? >>> back here in the u.s., could it be michigan which used to call itself the worker's paradise union state is now moving towards new anti-union right-to-work legislation and it looks like it's going to pass? but first up, budget talks resume between speaker john boehner and president obama today. with just 25 days to go, let's keep tabs on where we stand. reports of a conservative backlash against speaker boehner simply not true. he has the solid support of his leadership and the rank and file. but there is concern among some in the gop that they are at risk of becoming the party for rich people while president obama and democrats stake their claim on the middle class. and my tax rate flexibility with higher -- here's what the president said earlier today. >> i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevent prevents the top rate from going up for folks at the top 2%. but i do remain optimistic that we can get something done that is good for families like this one and that is good for the american economy. >> w
a growing u.s. economy, bob? >> first of all, andrea got to get over the election. it is over, okay. you lost. you have another shot. these things happen. just calm down. it will be all right. now, by the way, immelt is exactly right. the chinese have been kicking our butts around for the last two decades economically. for what they have got, which is a communist-managed economiter doing a very good job of it. not something we want. not something we want of our allies but it is working and you can't argue with that. they have been growing at phenomenal rate. >> currency manipulation, human rights violations. one-child policy. martha: i get bob's point. what bob is saying. business people tend to look at things in, you know, in terms of efficiency. does it work. i think in many ways he was trying to separate his argument here saying this system that works and u.s. economy then is forced to deal with it in the form that it exists if we want to be competitive. >> here's our problem as we're shipping all the jobs over to china. we're borrowing money from china and we have to pay interest on
of those who serve and the fallen. the u.s. military this year so far, john, has lost 305 in afghanistan. >> so important to remember, barbara. as you said, the doctor and the mission was successful. the doctor was rescued? >> yes, he was. taken to a u.s. military hospital where he's recovering. i think we can expect him to be on his way home to see his family very shortly. you know, i just wand to add, the u.s. military has specially trained hostage rescue teams that are special forces. it's some of the most dangerous business that the u.s. military can do. but by all accounts the navy seal was killed by small arms fire which suggests, and we don't know the details yet, that certainly suggest that's there was quite a fire fight during this mission, john. >> barbara star from the pentagon, thank you. >>> let's get you up to date. here is christine romans with this morning's top stories. >> president obama and house speaker john boehner finally meeting face-to-face over the fiscal cliff. they sat down at the white house yesterday. neither side is discussing details. both agree the lines o
? >> yes. >> they would have to get a lot of cashes from overseas by the way. you hear cash at u.s. corporations, a lot of it is overseas. repatriation tax holiday is not part of any negotiations we've been hearing about. >> not at all. >> an area that's a no go. so that is an important part of the calculation. if you can't bring that cash back and goldman says this. this is not something they think is going to happen. >> do you remember when steve brought seagate private. it was brimming with cash. raised the dividend next week. why doesn't michael dell pay out a special dividend and everyone is thrilled. >> fundamentals are still what? >> fundamentals are -- i mean, look. fundamentals depend upon a belief that the personal computer is going to be with us for a long time and is not that much in decline. ipad will not crush it. i don't know. >> why not redistrict some of that free cash flow and that cash into an area where you think you can attain real growth. try to recreate the company in some sort of significant way. >> i think that -- >> it's not easy to do that by the way. >>
have marginal movement, the cac up 4.2%. the ftse 100 up above .23%. >> u.s. equity futures at this hour -- whoa. hold it. >> what are you looking at? u.s. equity futures. >> it's okay on. didn't we already do this? >> i don't care. i really don't. the new prompter is giving you fits. and yesterday, it ended with a -- did you see that one yesterday? a word ended with a n and the next one i introduced the like like t. boone pickens or something like that. >> we have a new teleprompter and it adds words. >> that's special. >> and people that, you know, that's where we get all of our info, right out of that baby there. anyway, futures are up 14 points. 13114 is where we are right now. i don't know. fiscal cliff is three days away and we're still above 13,000. that's what we're talking about. you would think if the growth was going to flow based on us going over the cliff, you would think oil would start to weaken. we haven't seen that much in that respect, either. as far as the ten year, stable at 98 of 6719. finally, gold -- i don't know. bernanke is on full 85 billion a month
and losses have been picking up in the last hour or so as we've seen renewed concern about the u.s. fiscal cliff whether a negotiation could be reached. we saw some optimism in the asian session overnight. i want to draw your attention to the most important story potentially for 20123 and that's what's happening in japan. you guys may recall yesterday it was up .9%. this market has been on a tear this year. it's up more than 20 one of the best asset classes. the yen continues to weaken. there's two reasons why we're focusing here. we got weak economic data out of japan. industrial production decline. we saw core consumer prices decline. we can show you, though, what's happening with the yen. we're seeing the new finance minister coming out and saying to other countries, you know, look, we're not trying to materially weaken our yen and you have no place to accuse us of doing so. he says a strong dollar policy would benefit the u.s. very much so. and, again, might benefit japan, too, because that will make it a lot easier to get that yen lower. today, the dollar/yen is up .2% because it's im
it is manufacturing, but is there really a demand question about apple's products that is a real one? >> not in the u.s., but there could be some questions about china, remember that report from steve milanovich? he said apple needs to come up within some real innovations, you need to have some clarity on the pipeline, and you need geographic -- clearance to go into china? yes, it got it with two of the smaller carriers. china confirms talks with apple. but the problem here, he says tech is not an issue, it's mainly about the business model and benefit sharing issues. that could be a problem. >> he is also playing the part of what many analysts are doing, which is let me explain why it's going down, in the same way that the death cross, i always love the death cross, this is a technical term. i can think of a million reasons to sell it. the only reason i want to own it is because it makes the best products in the world and it's inexpensive. >> that's a lot of people looking at the chart. >> look again, the people who own apple, they were the ones who owned it because it was going up. it reminds me very
into play at the moment as we wait for the u.s. session. we did have a good piece of news, though, out of china. the new leadership saying wle do whatever it takes to maintain solid economic growth. the shanghai composite up nearly 3% today. that boosted retail stocks. we also had a spanish bond auction, prefunding for 2013. got nearly the 4.5 billion they wanted. yields in spain. the ten-year did come lower on that auction, so not a bad result. and bid to cover was okay. so spanish yields slightly higher after that. didn't raise the maximum amount. that's where we stand. it's another cautious day under way in europe. back to you guys. >> might get my haircut like hers, ross. you know, that anna wintour. that bizarre -- do you think you can manage it? >> a page boy. >> you think you carry that one? >> you'd look awful. >> you know what? we're going to do it. >> you're asking these guys to put me -- >> you'd look good in that one from "dumb & dumber." >> yeah. i make that sound. the most annoying -- you want me to do that? >> no, we don't. >> morgan stanley is trying to bolster lending.
on and take a look at some other data here. what's the biggest threat to the u.s. economy? slow job growth, 9%. moving on here to the next one, the euro crisis, that's come way down, 11%. the next one is going to be 33%. the winner, the fiscal cliff, 35%. what are people saying about the fiscal cliff? we have people write in, and i believe that's what we'll look at next. we'll look at the probability of a u.s. recession. that has come up. in part because of the fiscal cliff concerns. it was 19% back in march. a high of 36%. so we're halfway between the low and the high pretty much. this is a 13-month high for the probability of recession. now we want to show you what people are saying about the fiscal cliff, allowing the economy to go over the cliff would be extremely reckless, says donnelly. they're going out to try to help the unemployment rate. wall street doesn't believe it's going to happen. they do believe it will help lower mortgage rates and the unemployment rate and not a lot of help expected for the stock market. melissa? >> steve, thanks for that. that's interesting stuff there. >>
growing criticism over the last several weeks because of the way that she portrayed the u.s. consulate in benghazi. she blamed an angry mob, not a terrorist attack by al qaeda. rice has said that she was working off of information she had at the time, but republicans largely led by senator john mccain have accused her of misleading the american people and said because of that, they wouldn't support her nomination. it was that pushback that led her to give a letter to the president saying that she did not wish to be considered. she said she believed the confirmation process would be long, lengthy and disruptive and just not worth it to the country at this time. president obama did accept that decision, and then said that he regretted it but also said that it spoke to her character. she will likely continue to work close w closely with the president, either as his u.n. ambassador or as his security adviser. he will likely now nominate senator john kerry. larry? >> many thanks. on top of the susan rice story, we are also learning tonight that retired nebraska republican senator chuck hage
, a larger theme of excess capitalization at u.s. corporations, and the fact that so much money is sitting on balance sheets doing nothing. >> did you read oracle? how much money do they have. they bought back 10 billion worth of stock. these companies, you read through their stories, and you say, not only did they not extend themselves during this downturn, they conserved a lot of cash. by the way, humans did, too, in america. have you seen the numbers that the federal reserve put out last night about how much money is being -- how little debt is being taken down by citizens. we're back to levels of the '90s. federal household debt service came out last night. the percentage of disposable income is 14%, down to 10%. that's 1994 levels. >> that's a big part of morgan stanley's call on citi today. from overweight to equal weight. consumer deleveraging in their view coming to an end. and the more clarity on regulations. we are exiting this really weird period of uncertainty. rules come into focus. and if these consumer balance sheet numbers are right. next year could look different, jim. >>
's been a gang buster year for the markets. unfortunately, the average u.s. investor out there has largely been on the sidelines. money in bonds, money into money market funds continuing to flow in the month of november. unfortunately, even as we do see a very, very good year for the stock market, not many investors are really taking part in this. >> i think we saw finally an outflow for bond funds in well over a year last week. that has been a rarity. we've warned many of our viewers, be careful of the duration risk. we're going into another year where many people are at least saying, okay, is the rally over? the 30-year rally in bonds, is it over? if it is, what is it going to mean? we've had people saying that the last three years. everybody's best trade was to short the long bond. it ended up being one of the worst trades you could make the last couple of years. >> in terms of being careful, speaking of being careful, today will be light volume, shortened session, but light volume. who knows what that could lead to. if you wanted bury bad news, christmas eve is the perfect day to do it
then we got regulation in china. in 1911 in the u.s. we had the triangle shirt waist fire that led to deaths and that wound up giving us more regulations. sometimes regulation saves lives. remember that the next time you see the anti-regulatory fever that you see so many other places on television. all right let's bring in teresa hahn the director of a labor rights organization, and they were the ones conducting investigations of working conditions in factories around the globe. teresa, do you have a sense of when walmart said those are too expensive, we can't do it. how true or untrue is that relative to their cost? is it really that would be prohibitively expensive or a regular course of business? >> it's something that walmart absolutely has the financial ability to do and could do it for a relatively small part of their overall finances. it's a matter of political will in walmart and the companies are not willing to put forward to them what is a relatively small amount of money that would ultimately save the lives of hundreds if not thousands of their workers for their supplier
in toronto as the nfl continues to move to expand its base outside of the u.s. a couple weeks ago, we had two new york jets fans. but now it's a couple more. great game between seattle and pittsburgh. >> did that guy get his pants pulled off? >> certainly did. my question to you, you got -- wasn't it nance and phil sympathies? >> yeah. >> don't you say, wow, there's a full moon today? don't you say something? >> i had to back it up on the dvr. >> was it immature to say -- i backed it up to show -- because we were laughing so hard. do you just not ignore -- >> it says something about our maturity levels. >> does it? and they're month march temperature? >> i felt bad for the player, i did. >> i did, but thank god it wasn't a full frontal. it was a full moon back. i would have said something. i wonder whether nance and simms should have just -- >> were they looking at it? >> they needed a joke. >> you needed to reference it. >> when they played the replay, they played it from a different angle. >> i think they -- come on, guys. in my entire life, i've never seen anything like that before. >> was
: the u.s. ski industry is heading downhill. a new study reports the winter tourism industry experienced an estimated one billion dollar loss over the past decade, due to, climate change. with the u.s. on track to have the warmest year in its history, the ski industry is being dealt another brutal blow. joining me is bob dean from the national resources defense council. one of the groups behind that particular study. bob, thank you. welcome to the show. >> thank you, sandra. good to be here. sandra: so let me get this straight. you're blaming the warm winters, lack of snow on climate change? >> absolutely. you mentioned sandra, we're on track as of end of the november we had the hottest year on record in this country. 3.3 degrees hotter than the 20th century average. it hurt our farmers and ranchers, devastated worst drought in 50 years. fires detroit nine million acres of forest and fields. we'll seeing it on the ski slopes. climate change for the slopes means less snow on the ground, feuder skiers on the slopes. if you make your living in the business, less money in the wallet and payc
, stabilization in europe and the u.s. at 2.7% gdp growth is a little stronger to handle this, so that's why i think you want to be buying on this. >> everybody wants to buy. so many people -- you want to be bullish, but these guys in washington, and gals in washington, give you so little reason to actually be bullish. you're right. the corporate sector you know, loaded with cash, fundamentals turning positive. >> but this is the big difference from last year, last summer where the economy was so fragile. we were in such a fragile state last suggest so it was easy to tip us over. now we're a little better here in the states but a lot better in china, and a little bit better in europe. >> we've got to get to jim. >> because of the contrarian view, jim, is once we get a deal, we sell right into the deal. >> yeah, that's right. i'm going tonight skunk at the garden party here, and i'm geg going to tell you i never thought we'd get a deal. throwing rocks at each other. more likely we won't get a deal. the economy is as bad as last summer, looking at 1.5% growth for the fourth quarter, maybe the sa
as a result of antitrust here in the u.s., a americaning of the two equity platforms of nasdaq and nyc. nyc kept as it, and my reporting is, let's call it september or so, right at the end of the summer, early fall, an overture was made to the nyc about a potential deal. discussions continued at that point and continued for a number of month ending with this morning's announcement from the two of them that they did in fact have a deal. fair >> david, what i'm hearing is that the cme group wanted to offer an even higher bid for the new york stock exchange. however, with this clearing agreement that the nyse has agreed to with i.c.e., that's probably not going to happen at this point, this is the deal that nyc is going to go with because apparently cme approached the ceo in the last couple of months, but it was probably too late. the nyc went ahead with i.c.e. and had been too further along. the question now, bob pisani, what happens with the other exchanges, hong kong, nasdaq? what are we seeing next in terms of the next target in the exchange space? >> well, at the very least, it's helped i
investors have pulled at least $380 billion u.s. stock funds from april 2007 and it's the first time ordinary investors have sold during a bull market since world war ii. >>> mortgage rates headed down last week according to freddie mac. the 30-year fixed rate average was 3.35%, just 0.04% from the 40-year lowest on record since 1971. the average on 30-year fixed rates was 3.66%, the lowest in 65 years. michelle, it seems like a good time to buy. >> yeah, maybe. >> thank you, seema, if you can get the loan. >>> why when we just upgraded their trade status in we're about to get answers from a russian expert just ahead. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and share something... or you can get out there and actually share something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit offection. report. i'm michelle caruso-cabrera. >> gun control advocates talk about great laws in gun ownership if great britain. there's only one problem, they don't work. they seem to have made things even worse. we'll talk more about that and it happens to
is very much pro-u.s., pro-growth, and bring us back to growing us inside and promoting that as opposed to saying a more broader scope. i think that broader scope will come about when you have a person with the ability to do that. i think in the end, it is about looking at their character, looking at their record, and what they have achieved. not about some video being shown. i think a has to be about real things being done to help the country. that is what i want to see. if that is what she can bring forth, great. host: by the way, here is a follow-up tweet by vatxn. now we know what that stands for. from "politico" this morning -- that is a little bit from "politico" on that fiscal cliff. david, thank you for holding. caller: yes, good morning. host: what do you think about hillary clinton could go future? caller: i do not think she will run. [indiscernible] we have the man that we need [indiscernible] we are not working. there is no way the government can be supported. host: that was david from georgia them but we are able to bring you some live events to date on c-span. this afterno
intervention, more than half say the u.s. and other countries should not send military planes and missiles to help the opposition fighters set up a safety zone. >>> in kabul earlier today an afghan police officer shot and killed an american contractor. this was inside police headquarters. this attack comes just a day after five afghan police, they were killed by their commander who police say was a taliban infiltrator. more than 50 have been killed by inside attacks this year. barbara starr, this is one of the main concerns as you know of the police of the forces, the international forces inside of afghanistan. you've got these rouge actors that infiltrate and are a part of killing what they -- these inside killings, the green on blue and blue on blue. tell us what happened. >> there's very little information available so far, suzanne. as you said, someone in an afghan police uniform. what is so interesting about this tragic incident is it was a woman in an afghan police uniform. whether she was a member of the afghan police or perhaps an infiltrator that stole the uniform somehow i think
questions from the audience. hosted by the u.s. chamber of commerce this is just under an hour. >> thank you very much. thank you, everyone, for being here this morning. especially those who traveled to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect.
, not a part of their plans, per se, in terms of just including it. here in the u.s., they still want the straight equities business. der riff city was the key. >> people want to believe this is not going to be the latest in a chain of squelch deals, denied deals. you think this one -- >> this one does not appear to have any hair on it when it comes to antitrust. >> nationalism. >> two u.s. companies. two u.s. companies. unless you want new york versus atlanta. that could be -- >> we did that. >> atlanta, the financial capital of the world. not the same ring to it. >> oracle buys a company. yesterday, merkel buys a company. today -- >> angela merkel bought a company? >> play that out. the insurance business. gardner denver perhaps. david -- >> yeah. >> this is deal mania. >> mention arris, trading up again, double the size of the -- what is happening? >> ge this week. >> potentially, the italian enginemaker. >> the fiscal cliff, result supposed to be frozen? aren't we supposed to be paralyzed? >> i guess the clock ran out on everybody saying we can't do anything? >> this is huge for u
and david faber. we're live from post 9 at the new york stock exchange. a vacuum here in terms of u.s. economic data. none on top today. we're looking at a flat open across the board. as for europe, movement there. the buyback of greek debt will in fact work. we're seeing just fractions of a percent in terms of changes there. our road map this morning starts with the latest in the fiscal cliff negotiations. the white house promptly rebuffs the gop counterproposal which calls for $800 billion in new tax revenue but without tax rate increases for the wealthy. could this tax issue deadlock the talks? >>> bank of america ceo warns the cliff must get stalled or the economy could be stifled well into 2014. >>> even more dividends pushed into 2012. coach, american eagle moving up and oracle will play out three-quarters of dividends this year. >>> more strength in housing this morning. toll brothers earnings top expectations. we'll begin with the fiscal cliff. governors are set to meet today with the president and congressional leaders. governors are concerned about the impact of deficit redu
the great recession with flying colors. about 30% of the dealers in the u.s. went under during the recession. isn't that extraordinary? but brunz week's dealer remained flat. they held in much better than the competition. they used the economic weakness to take share. plus the company took out $450 million in fixed costs during the downturn to come out even stronger than ever. that's the brunswick we're dealing with today. second, if higher taxes going forward mean there's slightly less demand for motorboats and fishing boats, you know what? i think that could be more than offset by the additional demand created by all those boats that sandy damaged or destroyed. and even before sandy, things were getting better for brunswick. over the last decade, the age of the average powerboat in the water has gone from 15 years old to 21 years old. wow! i thought cars at 11 years was a lot. that means there's a ton of pent-up replacement demand. we saw the same thing happen in the automobile market where the average car on the road got so old that it has led to a new surge. that's what that $15 million
third choice. u.s. first, europe second. and i think there is more beyond with the government having an emerging plan. this is just taking a long period of time and i think that will continue on to next year. >> a very interesting guy, robert kapito. you just heard him say that his choices in order were u.s., then emerging markets, then europe. if you were to follow that advice and put money into the u.s. market, give me a couple of names would you look for for 2013. >> first of all, you want to buy names that cater to all of us that have less money. let's talk about one of those names. mcdonald's and costco. mcdonald'scaters to a letter budget crowd. obviously they have a huge emerging market expansion as well. and they seem to be capturing market share from starbucks. they've enrolled in juices and try to capture market share from jamba juice. >> a horrible luxury. not a luxury. but affordable food. >> correct. now let's go to affordable food. costco, you go to the back and there's the milk. but you have to go through the middle section. the middle section is what people buy, the h
claim this morning that it has captured an unmanned u.s. drone. iranian state television broadcast what it claims is the drone, and says the aircraft was collecting data in iranian air space. but, a u.s. defense official tells cnn that the navy has accounted for all of its drones, and that whatever iran claims to have, it is not an actively operating american drone. >>> the head of the cdc warns that all the signs are pointing to a bad flu season this year. cdc director dr. thomas friedan is advising all americans over the age of 6 months to get vac continuated. he says the flu arrived early this year but the vaccine is an excellent tool to fight it. soledad, i did not, and i never do. but i may this year. >> really? >> i don't. >> why not? >> because i get sick every year. so i don't bother. >> think about that for a moment. it's so easy. >> i got it one year and i got sick and so i thought, well -- >> it's very scientific. >> i think everybody in my little world, get a flu shot. >> listen to them. >> let's talk about prince william. he's back at a london hospital this morning with his
, a u.s. investigation finds more evidence about how walmart used payoffs allegedly in mexico to advance its gold down there. it's tuesday, december 18th, 2012. "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning, everyone. welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm becky quick along with joe kernen and andrew ross sorkin. our guest host this hour is julia sed. fiscal cliff negotiations, our top story. now president obama is proposing leaving lower tax rates in place for everyone except those earning $400,000 and above. that's above the $250,000 threshold that the president has been demanding for months, but it is still far from speaker john boehner's request of $1 million. a source familiar with the talk says this is by no means the final offer for the white house. the move by the president was welcomed, albeit with some reservations. we will talk about the latest developments in just a few minutes. in the meantime, the global markets seem to be taking note of the optimism. you can see right now that those dow futures are up by 54 points. this comes after a decent rally for the markets yeste
's take a look at the u.s. futures set up for the open first of the week. dow looking at about 50 points right after the open. as for the action in europe, taking its cues from the united states. we'll see a big rally in china extending one of its biggest rallies in three years. we have a mixed bag in europe with italy up by about .2 of 1%. >> we'll do our best to keep focused on the business day. we'll be following the tragic shooting in connecticut, of course. the new york stock exchange will hold a moment of silence to honor the victims in the next few moments, and we'll be looking at the president's call for meaningful action and the politics of gun control. >> let's get to a road map for this morning. it starts with apple. under pressure once again. even dipping below $500 a share at some point this morning. shares will remain range bound near term. iphone 5 sales and cannibalization among the region. >> other concessions from the gop, the speaker proposing tax hikes for millionaires. could this be the tipping point. moving the talks beyond deadlock. >> a big week for earnings. yes,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 61 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)